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If you suffer from an eating disorder now or have in the past, please email Joanna for a free telephone consultation.

 joanna@poppink.com

Eating Disorder Recovery
Joanna Poppink, MFT
Eating Disorder Recovery Psychotherapist
serving Arizona, California, Florida, Oregon and Utah.
All appointments are virtual.

Eating disorders and sleep                                                            
If you have an eating disorder you may yearn for this kind of peaceful sleep.


Eating Disorders: Impact on Sleep and Vice Versa

Individuals with eating disorders often face significant challenges when it comes to sleep. The bidirectional relationship between eating disorders and sleep disturbances means that both conditions can exacerbate each other, leading to a vicious cycle that can be difficult to break. Understanding the causes and impacts of sleep disturbance in eating disorders is crucial for developing effective strategies to address these issues and support the recovery process.

Anxiety and Stress Affect Sleep and Stimulate Eating Disorders

One of the key factors contributing to sleep disturbances in individuals with eating disorders is anxiety and stress. The constant worry, self-criticism, and body image concerns that often accompany these disorders can make it difficult to relax and unwind, leading to difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep throughout the night. Racing thoughts related to food, weight, and body image can keep individuals awake, further exacerbating their anxiety and emotional distress.

Nutritional Deficiencies

The nutritional deficiencies that often occur as a result of disordered eating can impact hormone production and regulation, leading to imbalances that affect sleep. For example, low levels of melatonin, the hormone responsible for regulating the sleep-wake cycle, can disrupt the natural sleep pattern. Imbalances in cortisol, the stress hormone, can also interfere with sleep, as elevated levels can keep individuals alert and on edge, making it challenging to achieve restful sleep.

The Psychological Impact of Eating Disorders

The psychological impact of eating disorders can also contribute to sleep disturbances. Negative self-perception, body dissatisfaction, and the emotional turmoil associated with these disorders can manifest as insomnia or nightmares. The intense emotions and thoughts that individuals with eating disorders experience can linger even during sleep, leading to disrupted and restless nights.

The impact of sleep disturbances on eating disorders should not be underestimated. Lack of quality sleep can exacerbate the emotional and psychological distress already experienced by individuals with eating disorders, making it more difficult to engage in healthy behaviors and sustain recovery efforts. Sleep deprivation can also affect appetite regulation, leading to increased food cravings, impulsive eating, or alterations in hunger signals, which can further perpetuate disordered eating patterns.

The Psychological Impact of Sleep Disturbances

Sleep disturbances can cause emotional instability, impaired cognitive functioning. They can worsen conditions such as anxiety, depression, PTSD. Psychological distres and vulnerability increases with sleep deprivation. These are the mental and emotional states that trigger eating disorder behaviors as the individual reaches out for comfort and soothing from the distress.


Helpful Sleep Strategies

To improve sleep in the context of eating disorder recovery, it is essential to implement strategies that address both the physical and psychological aspects of sleep disturbance. Establishing a consistent sleep schedule can help regulate the sleep-wake cycle, allowing the body to develop a natural rhythm. Creating a sleep-friendly environment, with a cool, dark, and quiet bedroom, can promote a restful atmosphere conducive to sleep. Removing electronic devices and engaging in a relaxing bedtime routine, such as reading or taking a warm bath, can signal to the body that it is time to wind down.

Practicing relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, or gentle stretching, before bed can help reduce anxiety and promote relaxation, making it easier to transition into sleep. Prioritizing proper nutrition and balanced meals is crucial for restoring hormonal balance, so working with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian can ensure that individuals in recovery are receiving the necessary nutrients to support both healthy sleep and overall recovery from the eating disorder.

If sleep disturbances persist despite implementing these strategies, seeking professional support is highly recommended. A healthcare professional experienced in treating eating disorders can provide personalized guidance and therapies tailored to address sleep issues within the context of recovery. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), for example, focuses on changing behaviors and thoughts that interfere with sleep, helping individuals develop healthier sleep patterns.

Sleep disturbances can significantly impact the course and severity of eating disorders. Lack of adequate sleep can exacerbate the emotional and psychological distress associated with these disorders, making it more challenging to engage in healthy behaviors and sustain recovery efforts. Furthermore, sleep deprivation can affect appetite regulation, leading to increased food cravings, impulsive eating, or altered hunger signals. 

Strategies for Improving Sleep in Eating Disorder Recovery:


Establish a Consistent Sleep Schedule: Creating a regular sleep routine can help regulate the sleep-wake cycle. Set consistent bedtimes and wake-up times, even on weekends, to promote a steady sleep pattern.

Create a Sleep-Friendly Environment: Ensure that your sleep environment is conducive to restful sleep. Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and quiet. Remove electronic devices and establish a relaxing bedtime routine to signal to your body that it is time to sleep.

Practice Relaxation Techniques: Engage in relaxation exercises, such as deep breathing, meditation, or gentle stretching before bed. These techniques can help alleviate anxiety and promote relaxation, preparing your body and mind for sleep.Prioritize Nutrition and Balanced Meals: Proper nutrition is vital for restoring hormonal balance. Consult with a healthcare professional or a registered dietitian to develop a balanced meal plan that supports both healthy sleep and recovery from the eating disorder.

Seek Professional Support: If sleep disturbances persist, seek guidance from a healthcare professional experienced in treating eating disorders. They can provide personalized strategies and therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), to address sleep issues within the context of eating disorder recovery.

Depth Psychotherapy:

If you have difficulty in working with these strategies you may be “hitting an unconscious wall.” Living with an eating disorder means you are trying to take care of yourself and protect yourself from perceived vulnerabilities and dangers you are not consciously aware of. Honoring strategies that could give you more beneficial sleep could also make you more aware of what is causing your anxieties and fears.

Giving up eating disorder protection from awareness means one of two things. You are at the mercy of what terrifies you without being able to take care of yourself. Or you have an opportunity to find out what terrifies you and develop the skills, strengths and awareness to care for and protect yourself without the eating disorder. This choice will determine whether you seek psychotherapy, the kind of psychotherapy that nurtures you, supports you and encourages the development of skills and strength to bear your awareness. This is in depth psychotherapy and involves dreams, images, memory, body work and patient integration of conscious and unconscious processes.

Recognizing the complex relationship between eating disorders and sleep disturbances is essential for comprehensive treatment and sustained recovery. By understanding the potential causes of sleep disruption and implementing effective strategies to improve sleep quality, individuals can support their overall well-being and enhance the recovery process. Restorative sleep is a vital component of the healing journey, promoting physical and mental health, and aiding in the development of healthier behaviors and self-care practices.

Summary of sleep disturbance issues in people with eating disorders:

  1. Causes of sleep disturbances in individuals with eating disorders include anxiety and stress, nutritional deficiencies, and psychological factors such as negative self-perception.
  2. Sleep disturbances can worsen the emotional and psychological distress associated with eating disorders and disrupt appetite regulation.
  3. Strategies for improving sleep in eating disorder recovery involve establishing a consistent sleep schedule, creating a sleep-friendly environment, practicing relaxation techniques, prioritizing balanced nutrition, and seeking professional support.
  4. Addressing sleep disturbances is crucial for comprehensive treatment and sustained recovery, as it supports overall well-being and enhances the development of healthier behaviors and self-care practices.
  5. Recognizing and addressing the relationship between eating disorders and sleep disturbances is crucial for comprehensive treatment and sustained recovery. By understanding the potential causes of sleep disruption, individuals in recovery can implement strategies to improve their sleep patterns. Creating a supportive sleep environment, practicing relaxation techniques, and seeking professional guidance can contribute to better sleep quality, which, in turn, supports overall well-being and enhances the recovery process from eating disorders.

By recognizing the factors contributing to sleep disturbances and implementing effective strategies, individuals can work towards improving sleep quality and supporting their overall recovery from eating disorders.


See:
Eating Disorder Behavior Triggered by Sleep Deprivation

Joanna Poppink, MFT, is a psychotherapist in private practice specializing in eating disorder recovery, stress, PTSD and adult development.

She is licensed in CA, AZ, OR, FL, UT. Author of Book: Healing Your Hungry Heart: recovering from your eating disorder 

Appointments are virtual.https://www.eatingdisorderrecovery.net   For a free telephone consultation e-mail her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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